Four Easy Japanese Dishes You Should Try Making

Japanese cuisine is renowned for being very healthy as well as delicious. Some of its meals might be difficult to make since the ingredients aren’t easily found in your local supermarket, but the ones below won’t give you that problem! From the Japanese hot pot of sukiyaki and shabu shabu to the well-known tempura and teriyaki, the four dishes below are all you need to experience genuine and easy Japanese dishes right at home.

Sukiyaki Hot Pot

Sukiyaki is a dish where premium beef sliced into thin strips is cooked right at the table in a sauce made from Japanese rice wines mirin and sake, as well as soy sauce and sugar. The Japanese love to dip the cooked beef in a dish of beaten raw egg before they eat it, making the dish even healthier.

Sukiyaki isn’t complete without some vegetables cooking alongside the beef. You can go for cabbage, mushrooms, scallions, and tofu, or any vegetable of your choice.

Shabu Shabu Hot Pot

Vegetarians will be interested in trying out the Japanese hot pot known as shabu shabu. All you need are vegetables of your choice that you then cook in a kelp-based broth though you can also go for chicken stock if kelp is hard to find. The key here is to swish (shabu) the vegetable in the broth as it is cooking until it is soft and ready to eat.

Once the vegetables are cooked, dip it in a sauce containing mirin, rice vinegar, and soy sauce. The leftover broth can be used as a soup or mixed with rice as a different meal too!

Chicken Teriyaki

Teriyaki is one of the most popular Japanese dishes around the world, and most people agree that the distinct flavor of its marinade, created from combining sake, mirin, soy sauce, sugar, ginger, and sesame oil is brought to its best advantage in the chicken. Teriyaki is best grilled or broiled, but you can fry or sauté the chicken in peanut oil instead, then adding the marinade once the chicken is thoroughly cooked.

Tempura

Sadako Sawamura in My Japanese Kitchen says cooking and eating tempura is a great way to beat the heat, and there’s no better way to make tempura than to follow her easy instructions. Don’t limit yourself to prawns, for whitefish, sweet potatoes, carrots, eggplant, green peppers, and fresh ginger will keep your tempura from getting boring!

Most restaurants coat the prawns and vegetables in a lot of batter, but Sawamura advises against doing that by coating the food as thinly as possible, which keeps your tempura healthier too! Genuine Japanese tempura tastes best if the batter is almost transparent once the tempura is fried, making it easy to see the food inside.

The Japanese believes in following the seasons as a way of fully enjoying food and life and great restaurants like Kisso follow that belief faithfully. With the four different dishes above that feature beef in sukiyaki, chicken in teriyaki, seafood in tempura and vegetables in the Japanese hot pot shabu shabu, you can also respect the Japanese tradition and enjoy delicious meals any season of the year!

Post Author: Yolanda Moore